St. Patrick's Day in the U.S


#1

The irony of this holiday in the U.S. never ceases to escape me.

  1. In the early to late 1800’s, most businesses had signs in their windows stating “No Irish need apply.” It took a long time for the Irish to convert the Americas. :smiley:

  2. The vast majority of people celebrating SPD in the U.S. do not have one milligram of Irish genes in them.

  3. The Americans dye everything green, in support of St. Patrick, whose official “color” was blue.

  4. The shamrock (an over-glorified word for “clover”) :four_leaf_clover: is not the symbol for Ireland or SPD, although you can find shamrocks pretty much everywhere in the world. The actual symbol of Ireland is the lyre (harp).

  1. SPD is the day St. Patrick “died,” not when he supposedly drove the snakes from Ireland.

  2. Snakes were never indigenous to Ireland. Maybe he was in search of worms to go fishing instead? :smiley:

Traditional Irish raccoon celebrating the holiday, playing a tune on his lyre.

:smiley:


#2

My uncle’s band, have a listen. They’re on Fremont Street in Vegas playing right now.


#3

Wow, your uncle must be pretty young. Sounds like a modern rock band. We have a group here locally who play all year round. All of their instruments are traditional (with a mix of some electric guitars). These guys sound really good. :smiley:


#4

He’s in his forties. He’s my uncle-in-law actually. Grandmother-in-law had kids early.
The Angry Brians (formerly 1916) play a ton of Celtic/Irish/Scottish Festivals here on the West Coast.

Check out their Facebook if you like them and here’s a link to Amazon if you want to hear more of the album.


https://www.facebook.com/1916ROCKS


#5

St Patrick was Welsh.

Just thought I’d throw that in to the mix :slight_smile:


#6

LMAO, forgot that he wasn’t even Irish. :smiley: